February Previews: To Buy or Not To Buy

Feb-09-09

So I did actually see Jason at the end of last week. He is alive, and getting out to see me was much easier than expected. He said the “bake a file in the cake” trick may be an old one, but there’s a reason it has stood the test of time.

When I encountered Jason at the end of the week (I hesitate to say where, as they may still be looking for him), he mentioned that he had seen the new Previews catalog and that there was very little of interest in it. I hadn’t glanced at it yet, but as there’s often little of interest to me these days, I expected he was correct. Imagine my surprise when I read mine, and came away with more items of interest than my tiny budget would ever allow me to buy! In an effort to educate Jason about the wonders of the February Previews catalog, I bring you this list with items of interest (at least to me):

Sinfest Volume 1: Many of you may not be familiar with this comic strip, which has been lighting the dark corners of the internet since the year 2000! There have been collections of Sinfest in the past, but they’ve always been published by the cartoonist’s own company. This one is being released by Dark Horse, and I’m quite excited to see if there’s any difference and what sort of production values they bring to it.

Booster Gold: 52 Pick-up: This is a comic that I’ve never actually read, but I’d like to. I don’t read any DC comics at the moment, but the reviews I’ve seen of this book make it sound like something I’d like. You take an established DC character, you tweak their concept ever so slightly, and you move them forward, respecting their continuity but not wallowing in it. Plus, you don’t have dogs eat people, introduce people vomiting blood, or stuff anyone’s dead girlfriend in a refrigerator. This should be simple, but most of DC can’t quite catch on to these simple guidelines, hence my not reading their titles. This was published as a hardcover, but now you can buy it in trade paperback form, so it’s affordable if you want to check it out.

Starman Omnibus Volume 3: I’ve raved about Starman so much that even I’m tired of hearing about it. Suffice to say it’s my favorite series of the 1990’s, and if you press me, perhaps my favorite superhero comic ever. It so deserves this hardcover treatment, and this includes the Shade miniseries that James Robinson wrote, and is quite worth picking up.

Tiny Titans: Adventures in Awesomeness: Much has been written about who DC expects to buy this title. It’s drawn in a fun and cartoony style, and seems to be aimed at kids (and DC has it as part of their kid’s line), but to understand many of the jokes you have to have a working knowledge of DC continuity. Well, perhaps DC is just expecting me to buy this title, and if so, I shall not disappoint them, as I find it a joy. Art Balthazar’s art and stories are so amazingly funny and bright and cheerful that I fell in love with them from issue #1, and I’ll support this title until it is no more. Now if I could just get Marvel to start publishing series just for me.

Preacher Book One: I’m just going to say this now and get it out of the way. Deep breath. I’ve never read Preacher. Whew. I…I feel much better now. Like a weight has been lifted off me. I know that any serious comic fan has read, learned, loved and lived this monumental comics masterpiece by now, but honestly, I’m not a big fan of Garth Ennis and when this first came out, it seemed to me that he was trying to go over the top simply so that he could go over the top. However, I’ve been assured by many that this is not the case and that Ennis has a real story to tell here. I trust these people, so I plan to pick this book up and give it a real chance very soon.

Rex Libris: Book of Monsters: Rex Libris is a gloriously fun comic, one that follows the adventures of a librarian who fights those who would keep books, refuse to pay their late fees, and otherwise arouse a librarian’s ire. It’s got some great action in it, and while it can be a little wordy at time, it’s very clever. It understands the humor in it’s very concept and it has fun with it, but its not total slapstick. I highly recommend it.

See: Look at that, we’re not even finished with the comic’s section and already we’ve found lots of great possibilities in this month’s Previews. Tomorrow I’ll look at a few more items I found to be of interest, including some stuff from Marvel!

BOO! Hey, remember me? I used to post on this blog too! Look, I don’t have much time…I can hear the dogs’ nervous barking rising over the tree-speckled ridge in the distance…but I needed to catch my breath and thought this might be a good time to chime in. When I mentioned that there wasn’t much in the latest Previews to pique my interest, I was basically referring to single issues. John has already made that great, blind leap from floppies to trades without ever looking back. I, on the other hand, still have a burning need for instant gratification and have been unable to completely ween myself from the teat of monthly comics. However, I’m inching closer with every passing Previews.

I feel I need to make a few comments on John’s first round of offerings. While he and I now shop at the same location (after the premature passing of my own establishment), I’m still not completely loyal in my purchasing habits. To be quite honest, Amazon still receives a good chunk of my comic-buying cash. Especially when it comes to new hardcover books. Sure, I’m willing to buy my Scott Pilgrim at our local store, but the latest Starman Omnibus makes more fiscal sense when it is shipped to me at a generous discount. So, while John is surfing the pages to fill out his monthly order of trades and other books, I’m merely looking for my pamphlet fix (dwindling as it may be). I don’t regard the higher-priced trades as “must haves” that particular month.

So…never heard of Sinfest. Not really interested in Booster Gold since they killed off his buddy Ted Kord. Starman will eventually make it to my shelf. I consider Art Baltazar and Franco to be convention pals, but I can’t justify buying Tiny Titans until it’s released in its Absolute format (I make myself laugh). I already own all of the Preacher trades. And Rex Libris never really lit my fuse. However, I am ordering the first part of the new League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

What else is on your radar, John?

Uh-oh…gotta run. The search party is getting closer. I’ll see you guys on the other side…

Did anybody else hear anything?  I could have sworn there was someone here, just a minute ago, talking to us.  Well, whoever it was, they’re gone now.  Time to post something new.

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Highlights of 2008

Dec-17-08

The last few days have been fun, as Jason and I peered into our crystal balls to look at what 2009 might hold. However, it’s possible that those thoughts may have seemed a tad cynical to some; I’ll go so far as to say that some may have called them snarky. It may seem to some readers that Jason and I look on the comics industry with disdain, and nothing could be farther from the truth. Well, ok, many things could be farther from the truth, but we’re not totally jaded. Along those lines, I wanted to look at some of the highlights of the previous year.

This is not a best of list. I simply don’t read the breadth of comics that I would need to read to compile a list like that. No, this is a list of what happened in 2008 that gives me hope for the future. I’ll also touch on those things that make me think that 2009 may not be such a bad year for comics after all.

A new Scott Pilgrim book announced for 2009. Jason and I have touted Scott Pilgrim quite a few times, but there’s a reason that this gives me hope. It has long been established that the only financially successful model for comics to follow is to publish monthly pamphlets (or floppies or whatever you want to call the comics that we all know so well) and then to collect those previously published floppies into trade paperbacks some months after their initial printing. There have been some original graphic novels, but generally those are only created by big name creators, those who already have a built in following.

Scott Pilgrim refuses to follow this model. Like the titular hero of the book, this creation comes to us in small graphic novels, each completely original. The writer/artist, Bryan Lee O’Malley, is not a well known creator with a built in following. Yet he’s publishing Scott Pilgrim in a way which I feel shows that there are other options beyond what Marvel and DC believe comics can be published. He’s not the only one who’s exploring alternate ways of publishing comics, but he’s one of the most successful and he gives me hope for the medium.

Jeff Smith’s career. Jeff Smith is the writer and artist who created the absolutely charming and exciting Bone comic, which he self-published. That comic ended in 2004, at which time Smith began working on the equally amazing and endearing Shazam: Monster Society of Evil, a four issue limited series which made the best use of DC’s Captain Marvel that I’d read in decades. Once that miniseries was over, Smith went back to creator owned work, publishing RASL, a series about a dimension-jumping art thief. So why does his career fill me with such hope?

I believe that corporate comics have a place, and can be quite enjoyable, but I also believe that they can drain the creative fire from a creator. I’ve seen creators who I greatly admire go to work for DC and Marvel, only to find the originality, humanity and that special unique voice they had disappear within that culture (<cough> Winick <cough>). Jeff Smith proved that you can do those corporate comics and not lose your voice. He’s also shown that he can succeed in multiple genres, as RASL has proven to be just as intriguing as Bone, albeit not as dependent on adorable animals and stars. I’d love to see more creators take those lessons to heart.

Captain America. She-Hulk. X-Factor. Manhunter. I’m not a big fan of where the Marvel or DC Universes are going these days. I find that both companies seem to favor brainless, unending crossovers, where perhaps a few good ideas lay buried, instead of simply publishing good books. That being said, the titles I mention above are all excellent comics, and they prove that even when you’re writing a comic set in a universe that has taken a turn for the worse, you can still write an entertaining story. Sadly, two of these four comics have been cancelled, but I have no doubt that they will be replaced by other entertaining books that shall dance on the periphery of the major superhero universes, reminding us that some people truly can make lemonade from even the tartest of lemons. They give me hope that, even if I don’t like the direction of Marvel and DC, they will always publish some comics I enjoy without reservation.

Ed Brubaker and Grant Morrison: These men have written some of the most mainstream comics on the stands today, and can be considered some of the movers and shakers of their respective universes. Not all of their comics are ones that I love, but more often than not, they have written books that continue to push at the edges of the comic’s medium, taking old, overused cliches of the business and making them work. Along the way, they’ve managed to create some comics which truly show that superheroes can be fun to read, they can be interesting, and they can be used to explore some important themes. I look forward to seeing what these gentlemen create in 2009.

DC Starts its Final Crisis: I’m not a big fan of this Final Crisis. That said, I love the word Final, and while I’m probably being naive, I’m hoping that it truly is final. I’m hoping that, in 2009, we’ll see DC move away from these huge events, and just start telling stories again. Stories that begin in a hero’s book and end (yes, they must end to be a story; Marvel and DC both need to recognize that) in that same book. Stories that don’t require a massive knowledge of the DCU, and stories that, simply put, are good. That’s my hope for 2009, and I have it because DC tells me that this is the last of their crises. Fingers crossed.

James Robinson returns to comics. Of course, he may have left again, if rumors are true, but his return gave me hope. I believe that Robinson is at his best when he’s writing books where he doesn’t have to worry about massive editorial interference, or worrying about umpty-bazillion crossovers, but just the fact that he’s writing comics again means we could possibly see the brilliance he displayed in Starman and The Golden Age. One of my favorite comics writers ever has returned, and that makes me happy.

There’s some of the things that give me hope for 2009. Jason, anything to add?

Yes, in fact, I do have a few things to add. Some build off of what you’ve already stated and others reflect my own twisted favorites in the comic industry.

First off, I heartily agree with your Scott Pilgrim recognition. I also like how you couched your point in the position that a new book was “announced” in 2008. While O’Malley has been rather methodical in putting out a volume a year, 2008 went by without any Scott Pilgrim. #4 came out towards the end of 2007 and #5 comes out early next year. I’m just glad to know we don’t have to wait much longer!

Your praise of a few good series interests me. I’ve been saying for a year or more that I wanted to start reading the She-Hulk trades. I guess it’ll be easier to catch up now that the series has been cancelled! I gave up on X-Factor a few issues ago. With the tie-ins to both Messiah Complex and Secret Invasion, it felt like the book lost its entertaining focus. The stories turned more towards plot devices than character interaction. And the artwork became quite horrible, in my opinion. Sad, really. I liked the early run that built off the Madrox miniseries from a couple years back. I’m on the second of Brubaker’s Captain America trades and it’s…interesting so far. Not sure I like it yet as much as his Daredevil run. All in all, Brubaker has probably impressed me the most this past year…from the mentioned titles to Criminal to Immortal Iron Fist…and, in the theme of this post, I’m looking forward to his Incognito book with Sean Phillips in 2009.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Brubaker’s partner in crime on Iron Fist (and Uncanny X-Men), Matt Fraction. You know how much I’ve enjoyed his writing the past few years. While his Marvel work has lost some of the attitude and sparkle of his more independent stuff, I still think Matt is one of the top up-and-comers in comics today. The first arc of his Invincible Iron Man felt like something I wanted to write, which is probably the best praise I can offer in my own conceited world. Curious to see what he has up his sleeve for 2009.

Andy Diggle on Thunderbolts has me curious. Loved his run on Losers, and the Green Arrow: Year One book was a solid take on the character. I’m also looking forward to Dan Slott’s run on Mighty Avengers. Partially because he’s not Bendis and partially because Slott is a huge Avengers fan, but mostly because he writes fun books with the right mix of action, comedy and crucial moments. I first became a fan of his work with the Arkham Asylum: Living Hell miniseries he did at DC in 2003. The early issues of his Avengers: Initiative drew my interest for a while, but I ended up cutting it from my pull list when it got too mired in “big event” plotting. Another book I liked was Paul Cornell’s Captain Britain and MI:13 series. Unfortunately, I only got the first four issues and then couldn’t track down the rest. I guess I’m looking forward to the trades in 2009!

I’ll echo your approval of James Robinson’s return. I picked up the first hardcover collection of Starman this summer and loved it. His Golden Age is one of my all-time favorite stories too. It’s true that he seems to work best when not being saddled by continuity and editorial interference. That said, volume two of Starman comes out in a few short months! DC has also started releasing larger hardcover collections of Y: The Last Man and just announced the same treatment for Fables. I give two thumbs up to those decisions. I want to get my wife interested in both titles (I already got her hooked on Preacher and Blue Monday) and these hardcovers seem like the best way to do it. On that note, Chynna Clugston started a new Blue Monday miniseries in 2008 and I look forward to grabbing that trade next year.

A lot of the other stuff I’m interested in may show up in my stocking from Santa next week. My wish list includes things like: Chip Kidd’s Bat-Manga book, the Skyscrapers of the Midwest collection from Josh Cotter, the first trade of Warren Ellis’ Freakangels, Mesmo Delivery by Rafael Grampa, a few of the Golden Age ACG archives (Green Lama, Magicman, Nemesis) put out by Dark Horse, the Scud collection from Image, Omega the Unknown by Jonathan Lethem & Farel Dalrymple and Blake Bell’s book about Steve Ditko. Most, if not all, of these books were released in 2008. Kudos to the comic industry for that output!

See? Not everything I read has superheroes in it!

On a final note, I’d also like to expand on your note that Final Crisis was introduced in 2008. Unfortunately, it wasn’t finished in 2008. I’m going to go on the record right now and announce that I just don’t care for event comics. Sure, I buy them every freakin’ time they put them out, but I think that’s more a collector’s reflex than any sort of focused interest. I’m almost always disappointed by the results. And DC’s overall universe has taken a gigantic hit in stability, from my point of view, as a result of all this constant “OH NO!” foreshadowing and angsty, heavy-handed plotting. There is not a single title on DC’s current slate, aside form some Vertigo titles, that interests me in the least. Two years ago, I was reading almost everything they put out. If that’s not a glaring problem, I don’t know what is. Sadly, Marvel is starting to deliver the same results for me. The only titles I consistently read anymore are the peripheral books that don’t seem to be as rooted in the general nonsense going on. I’d like to see a moratorium on Events (with a capital “E”). At the least, corral them into a family of titles instead of the entire breadth of your output. The dreaded Spider-Man: Clone Saga was an odious piece of garbage, but it was segregated enough to keep its stench off the rest of the world. Same goes for most X-Men soap opera plots that I have less and less interest in as I get older. Is it too much to ask that we just get an excellent run of Justice League stories or Avengers stories or Batman stories or (god forbid) Wolverine stories without all the restless claptrap constantly revolving around them? And don’t tell me that the “market has changed” and the “customers’ expectations have evolved.” That’s complete and utter bull. These changes and evolutions are self-made. Writers write “for the trades” because they’re lazy or because the publishers are greedy. It has nothing to do with the readers. I’m pretty sure I never signed a petition asking for gloomy, redundant, violent comics without a glimmer of hope or excitement. I don’t remember picketing outside DC’s offices with a sign that said “More Rape Please!” I’m not saying Spider-Man shouldn’t be punching bad guys in the face. On the contrary, I think he should do more of it…with less of the “sky is falling” consequences, sideways glances, overwhelming politics and downward-spiral finality of it all. Lighten the f*** up.

I know that rant isn’t really a “highlight” of 2008. But perhaps 2009 could be the year we get back to good, fun comics? I’d like to be able to praise that accomplishment at this time next year.

John?

Jason, Jason, take your tablets.  Go to your happy place for a few minutes.  We’ll wait.

Of course, I can’t disagree with your rant at all.  Your points are all valid, I agree with them, and I would also love to see 2009 be a return to more fun comics.  Not every comic has to be Giffen/DeMatteis’ Justice League, but not every comic has to be a blood drenched gritty buzzkiller either.  Good grief.  Alan Moore (not one of Jason’s favorites, but I like his work) seems to be able to do serious stories that don’t seem to drown in pathos and unnecessary violence.  Perhaps it’s because, for every From Hell he’s written, he’s also produced a more lighthearted book, like Tomorrow Stories or Tom Strong

Still, I believe we may have gotten off point a tad.  I will echo your words about Dan Slott, a writer who does an excellent job of writing good stories, yet recognizing that they can be fun.  His Great Lakes Avengers limited series is still one of my favorites.  And for those, like you, who were turned off by Larry Stroman’s art on X-Factor, he has left the book, so you may want to give it another try.

We’ve both shared some of what we thought was important in 2008, as well as what gives us hope in 2009.  There’s good stuff out now to read, and more on the way, but the percentage of good reads compared to what’s being published isn’t nearly as high as it should be.