Highlights of 2008

Dec-17-08

The last few days have been fun, as Jason and I peered into our crystal balls to look at what 2009 might hold. However, it’s possible that those thoughts may have seemed a tad cynical to some; I’ll go so far as to say that some may have called them snarky. It may seem to some readers that Jason and I look on the comics industry with disdain, and nothing could be farther from the truth. Well, ok, many things could be farther from the truth, but we’re not totally jaded. Along those lines, I wanted to look at some of the highlights of the previous year.

This is not a best of list. I simply don’t read the breadth of comics that I would need to read to compile a list like that. No, this is a list of what happened in 2008 that gives me hope for the future. I’ll also touch on those things that make me think that 2009 may not be such a bad year for comics after all.

A new Scott Pilgrim book announced for 2009. Jason and I have touted Scott Pilgrim quite a few times, but there’s a reason that this gives me hope. It has long been established that the only financially successful model for comics to follow is to publish monthly pamphlets (or floppies or whatever you want to call the comics that we all know so well) and then to collect those previously published floppies into trade paperbacks some months after their initial printing. There have been some original graphic novels, but generally those are only created by big name creators, those who already have a built in following.

Scott Pilgrim refuses to follow this model. Like the titular hero of the book, this creation comes to us in small graphic novels, each completely original. The writer/artist, Bryan Lee O’Malley, is not a well known creator with a built in following. Yet he’s publishing Scott Pilgrim in a way which I feel shows that there are other options beyond what Marvel and DC believe comics can be published. He’s not the only one who’s exploring alternate ways of publishing comics, but he’s one of the most successful and he gives me hope for the medium.

Jeff Smith’s career. Jeff Smith is the writer and artist who created the absolutely charming and exciting Bone comic, which he self-published. That comic ended in 2004, at which time Smith began working on the equally amazing and endearing Shazam: Monster Society of Evil, a four issue limited series which made the best use of DC’s Captain Marvel that I’d read in decades. Once that miniseries was over, Smith went back to creator owned work, publishing RASL, a series about a dimension-jumping art thief. So why does his career fill me with such hope?

I believe that corporate comics have a place, and can be quite enjoyable, but I also believe that they can drain the creative fire from a creator. I’ve seen creators who I greatly admire go to work for DC and Marvel, only to find the originality, humanity and that special unique voice they had disappear within that culture (<cough> Winick <cough>). Jeff Smith proved that you can do those corporate comics and not lose your voice. He’s also shown that he can succeed in multiple genres, as RASL has proven to be just as intriguing as Bone, albeit not as dependent on adorable animals and stars. I’d love to see more creators take those lessons to heart.

Captain America. She-Hulk. X-Factor. Manhunter. I’m not a big fan of where the Marvel or DC Universes are going these days. I find that both companies seem to favor brainless, unending crossovers, where perhaps a few good ideas lay buried, instead of simply publishing good books. That being said, the titles I mention above are all excellent comics, and they prove that even when you’re writing a comic set in a universe that has taken a turn for the worse, you can still write an entertaining story. Sadly, two of these four comics have been cancelled, but I have no doubt that they will be replaced by other entertaining books that shall dance on the periphery of the major superhero universes, reminding us that some people truly can make lemonade from even the tartest of lemons. They give me hope that, even if I don’t like the direction of Marvel and DC, they will always publish some comics I enjoy without reservation.

Ed Brubaker and Grant Morrison: These men have written some of the most mainstream comics on the stands today, and can be considered some of the movers and shakers of their respective universes. Not all of their comics are ones that I love, but more often than not, they have written books that continue to push at the edges of the comic’s medium, taking old, overused cliches of the business and making them work. Along the way, they’ve managed to create some comics which truly show that superheroes can be fun to read, they can be interesting, and they can be used to explore some important themes. I look forward to seeing what these gentlemen create in 2009.

DC Starts its Final Crisis: I’m not a big fan of this Final Crisis. That said, I love the word Final, and while I’m probably being naive, I’m hoping that it truly is final. I’m hoping that, in 2009, we’ll see DC move away from these huge events, and just start telling stories again. Stories that begin in a hero’s book and end (yes, they must end to be a story; Marvel and DC both need to recognize that) in that same book. Stories that don’t require a massive knowledge of the DCU, and stories that, simply put, are good. That’s my hope for 2009, and I have it because DC tells me that this is the last of their crises. Fingers crossed.

James Robinson returns to comics. Of course, he may have left again, if rumors are true, but his return gave me hope. I believe that Robinson is at his best when he’s writing books where he doesn’t have to worry about massive editorial interference, or worrying about umpty-bazillion crossovers, but just the fact that he’s writing comics again means we could possibly see the brilliance he displayed in Starman and The Golden Age. One of my favorite comics writers ever has returned, and that makes me happy.

There’s some of the things that give me hope for 2009. Jason, anything to add?

Yes, in fact, I do have a few things to add. Some build off of what you’ve already stated and others reflect my own twisted favorites in the comic industry.

First off, I heartily agree with your Scott Pilgrim recognition. I also like how you couched your point in the position that a new book was “announced” in 2008. While O’Malley has been rather methodical in putting out a volume a year, 2008 went by without any Scott Pilgrim. #4 came out towards the end of 2007 and #5 comes out early next year. I’m just glad to know we don’t have to wait much longer!

Your praise of a few good series interests me. I’ve been saying for a year or more that I wanted to start reading the She-Hulk trades. I guess it’ll be easier to catch up now that the series has been cancelled! I gave up on X-Factor a few issues ago. With the tie-ins to both Messiah Complex and Secret Invasion, it felt like the book lost its entertaining focus. The stories turned more towards plot devices than character interaction. And the artwork became quite horrible, in my opinion. Sad, really. I liked the early run that built off the Madrox miniseries from a couple years back. I’m on the second of Brubaker’s Captain America trades and it’s…interesting so far. Not sure I like it yet as much as his Daredevil run. All in all, Brubaker has probably impressed me the most this past year…from the mentioned titles to Criminal to Immortal Iron Fist…and, in the theme of this post, I’m looking forward to his Incognito book with Sean Phillips in 2009.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention Brubaker’s partner in crime on Iron Fist (and Uncanny X-Men), Matt Fraction. You know how much I’ve enjoyed his writing the past few years. While his Marvel work has lost some of the attitude and sparkle of his more independent stuff, I still think Matt is one of the top up-and-comers in comics today. The first arc of his Invincible Iron Man felt like something I wanted to write, which is probably the best praise I can offer in my own conceited world. Curious to see what he has up his sleeve for 2009.

Andy Diggle on Thunderbolts has me curious. Loved his run on Losers, and the Green Arrow: Year One book was a solid take on the character. I’m also looking forward to Dan Slott’s run on Mighty Avengers. Partially because he’s not Bendis and partially because Slott is a huge Avengers fan, but mostly because he writes fun books with the right mix of action, comedy and crucial moments. I first became a fan of his work with the Arkham Asylum: Living Hell miniseries he did at DC in 2003. The early issues of his Avengers: Initiative drew my interest for a while, but I ended up cutting it from my pull list when it got too mired in “big event” plotting. Another book I liked was Paul Cornell’s Captain Britain and MI:13 series. Unfortunately, I only got the first four issues and then couldn’t track down the rest. I guess I’m looking forward to the trades in 2009!

I’ll echo your approval of James Robinson’s return. I picked up the first hardcover collection of Starman this summer and loved it. His Golden Age is one of my all-time favorite stories too. It’s true that he seems to work best when not being saddled by continuity and editorial interference. That said, volume two of Starman comes out in a few short months! DC has also started releasing larger hardcover collections of Y: The Last Man and just announced the same treatment for Fables. I give two thumbs up to those decisions. I want to get my wife interested in both titles (I already got her hooked on Preacher and Blue Monday) and these hardcovers seem like the best way to do it. On that note, Chynna Clugston started a new Blue Monday miniseries in 2008 and I look forward to grabbing that trade next year.

A lot of the other stuff I’m interested in may show up in my stocking from Santa next week. My wish list includes things like: Chip Kidd’s Bat-Manga book, the Skyscrapers of the Midwest collection from Josh Cotter, the first trade of Warren Ellis’ Freakangels, Mesmo Delivery by Rafael Grampa, a few of the Golden Age ACG archives (Green Lama, Magicman, Nemesis) put out by Dark Horse, the Scud collection from Image, Omega the Unknown by Jonathan Lethem & Farel Dalrymple and Blake Bell’s book about Steve Ditko. Most, if not all, of these books were released in 2008. Kudos to the comic industry for that output!

See? Not everything I read has superheroes in it!

On a final note, I’d also like to expand on your note that Final Crisis was introduced in 2008. Unfortunately, it wasn’t finished in 2008. I’m going to go on the record right now and announce that I just don’t care for event comics. Sure, I buy them every freakin’ time they put them out, but I think that’s more a collector’s reflex than any sort of focused interest. I’m almost always disappointed by the results. And DC’s overall universe has taken a gigantic hit in stability, from my point of view, as a result of all this constant “OH NO!” foreshadowing and angsty, heavy-handed plotting. There is not a single title on DC’s current slate, aside form some Vertigo titles, that interests me in the least. Two years ago, I was reading almost everything they put out. If that’s not a glaring problem, I don’t know what is. Sadly, Marvel is starting to deliver the same results for me. The only titles I consistently read anymore are the peripheral books that don’t seem to be as rooted in the general nonsense going on. I’d like to see a moratorium on Events (with a capital “E”). At the least, corral them into a family of titles instead of the entire breadth of your output. The dreaded Spider-Man: Clone Saga was an odious piece of garbage, but it was segregated enough to keep its stench off the rest of the world. Same goes for most X-Men soap opera plots that I have less and less interest in as I get older. Is it too much to ask that we just get an excellent run of Justice League stories or Avengers stories or Batman stories or (god forbid) Wolverine stories without all the restless claptrap constantly revolving around them? And don’t tell me that the “market has changed” and the “customers’ expectations have evolved.” That’s complete and utter bull. These changes and evolutions are self-made. Writers write “for the trades” because they’re lazy or because the publishers are greedy. It has nothing to do with the readers. I’m pretty sure I never signed a petition asking for gloomy, redundant, violent comics without a glimmer of hope or excitement. I don’t remember picketing outside DC’s offices with a sign that said “More Rape Please!” I’m not saying Spider-Man shouldn’t be punching bad guys in the face. On the contrary, I think he should do more of it…with less of the “sky is falling” consequences, sideways glances, overwhelming politics and downward-spiral finality of it all. Lighten the f*** up.

I know that rant isn’t really a “highlight” of 2008. But perhaps 2009 could be the year we get back to good, fun comics? I’d like to be able to praise that accomplishment at this time next year.

John?

Jason, Jason, take your tablets.  Go to your happy place for a few minutes.  We’ll wait.

Of course, I can’t disagree with your rant at all.  Your points are all valid, I agree with them, and I would also love to see 2009 be a return to more fun comics.  Not every comic has to be Giffen/DeMatteis’ Justice League, but not every comic has to be a blood drenched gritty buzzkiller either.  Good grief.  Alan Moore (not one of Jason’s favorites, but I like his work) seems to be able to do serious stories that don’t seem to drown in pathos and unnecessary violence.  Perhaps it’s because, for every From Hell he’s written, he’s also produced a more lighthearted book, like Tomorrow Stories or Tom Strong

Still, I believe we may have gotten off point a tad.  I will echo your words about Dan Slott, a writer who does an excellent job of writing good stories, yet recognizing that they can be fun.  His Great Lakes Avengers limited series is still one of my favorites.  And for those, like you, who were turned off by Larry Stroman’s art on X-Factor, he has left the book, so you may want to give it another try.

We’ve both shared some of what we thought was important in 2008, as well as what gives us hope in 2009.  There’s good stuff out now to read, and more on the way, but the percentage of good reads compared to what’s being published isn’t nearly as high as it should be.

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John’s Things to be Thankful For in 2008

Nov-24-08

Yes, it’s the week of Thanksgiving, and while we do honestly plan to tackle the subject of Grant Morrison eventually, we’ve decided to take a break before the holidays to discuss what made us thankful as comics fans during the year 2008. I’ve listed mine below, and I should mention that there’s no particular order to this list. I’m just using numbers for organizational purposes. With that said, here we go (and, in order to keep the post a bit smaller, I’m just going to throw in my comments on your list after each item. My list will be posted tomorrow. – Jason)! I am thankful for:

1. DC’s Excellent Policy of Reprinting Older Issues: While both Marvel and DC are heavily investing in trade paperbacks, graphic novels and hardcover collections of their vast libraries, DC does a much better job of actually keeping those issues in print than Marvel does. Plus, DC started publishing Omnibus collections of the entire run of Starman (along with some of the miscellaneous one-shots and mini-series that tied into it) and Keith Giffen and J.M. DeMatteis’ Justice League International, two series that I’ve included amongst my favorites in the past. Yes, I have the original issues and have read them over and over, but I’m thrilled to have nice, handsome bookshelf friendly collected editions as well.

Agreed on the Starman omnibuses (omnibi?). Beautiful presentation and good price for the content. Sadly, because of the twisted and quite random collector gene in me, I won’t buy the JLI volumes…not because I don’t think the book is fantabulous, but because I already own the singles and I have other non-owned things that I’d like to purchase first. You forgot to mention that DC is now doing this with the complete Y: The Last Man run too. Looking forward to getting those.

2. GIT Corp’s Comics DVD-Rom Collections: For the past few years, a company called GIT Corp has been collecting the entire run of comics and magazines and collecting them on DVD-Roms. They had been working with Marvel, and while I know there are some people who don’t like the idea of reading comics on a computer screen, I found that being able to get EVERY SINGLE ISSUE of, say, Amazing Spider-Man, from his first appearance in the title to when Civil War began, for only $50.00 was too good to pass up! Heck, both the Marvel Masterworks and the DC Archives retail for more than that amount now, and they only contain ten issues! Sure, there are some bad issues in that run, but the sheer volume of good issues more than compensate for that. Additionally, these issues are complete on the disc, including ads, letters pages and the Bullpen Bulletins. What a deal! Unfortunately, Marvel and GIT seem to have had a falling out, but GIT this year released compilations of Archie and Star Trek comics. While the Archie comics aren’t my cup of tea, I was excited about the possibilities that perhaps other companies may do business with GIT Corp and can’t wait to see what they come out with next!

I know how obsessed you are with these things and I’m sorry the Marvel well seems to have run dry. I will say, the one disk you gave me had an excellent format to it. I liked the look of the interface and the controls too. Perhaps sometime down the line I’ll look into getting some of these for my kids…since I’m not-so-secretly concerned about them damaging my collection.

3. The Iron Man Movie: I’ve enjoyed a lot of comic book movies in my day, but honestly, I’m not sure that I’ve ever enjoyed one as much as I did Iron Man. Everything about this movie was well done, from the script, to the acting, to the action. I know that The Dark Knight grabbed the majority of the media attention, and don’t get me wrong, Christopher Nolan and his crew did a fantastic job with that movie, but I think that Iron Man is just more fun. With the success of that movie, as well as The Incredible Hulk movie (which I enjoyed, although not as much as Iron Man) I have such hope for Marvel’s movies in the years ahead, and am truly excited to see their Avengers movie hit the screens.

Agreed on Iron Man. Excellent film. The Dark Knight was a bit long and the plot was, at best, difficult.

4. Manhunter from DC Comics: I read very few of the current mainstream DC Comics universe, as I find it depressing and disturbing. However, Marc Andreyko has continued to do an amazing job with Manhunter. As of now, it’s been cancelled (again) but even if it doesn’t come back, I’m thankful that we got as many issues of it as we did. The neat trick about this series is that it is a dark comic, with some serious themes and a rather gritty atmosphere, but it doesn’t cross the line that most of the rest of the DC Comics Universe has crossed. It continues to hold a core of hope at its center that so many DC Comics have abandoned, and that’s why I’m so grateful to it.

5. Comics Publishers outside the Big Two: I’ve been reading more and more comics that aren’t published by Marvel and DC, and honestly, some months, they’re the only things that keep me interested in the form. From Dark Horse to Image to IDW to Oni to Fantagraphics to a gazillion others whom I couldn’t even begin to list, they provide an alternative to what you find at Marvel and DC. Just like with Marvel and DC, not everything they publish is excellent, but there’s a lot of really neat ideas out there, and I encourage readers to explore them.

I will expand on this thought with some more specific examples in my own list. I’d just like to point out that, as much as we talk about Marvel and DC (which is close to 100% of the time on this blog), we’re both highly open to the so-called “independents” and have some wide-ranging offerings on our shelves.

6. The Umbrella Academy from Dark Horse Comics: Speaking of books published by other companies, I found The Umbrella Academy (which began in 2007 and ended in 2008) to be a joy. It’s incredibly weird, and perhaps not for everyone, but if your sensibilities are a little off of center, if you’re a fan of Tim Burton, and if you think odd is good, then I think you’ll enjoy this series. It’s basically a superhero story, about a very special family of heroes. It’s not quite as surreal as Scud, but it’s close. Oh, speaking of which..

7. Scud: The Disposable Assassin completely collected: I had been a fan of Scud in the mid-90s when the stories were originally published, but had come into the series late and didn’t have every issue. This year, the entire series (and a one-shot) were released in one package, and I finally got to read the story from beginning to ending. Scud, for those who are unaware, is an assassin who will self-destruct once he kills his target. To prevent this, he wounds his target, puts her on life support, and then begins taking jobs as a mercenary to pay for her upkeep. It’s a brilliant premise, and the series proved to be one of the most surreal I’d ever read (Benjamin Franklin is one of the main villains). Still, it’s loads of fun, and pokes fun at pop culture all over the place. I highly recommend it.

I bought the Umbrella Academy trade three months ago and haven’t gotten around to it yet, but I’m hopeful of it’s cleverness. I’m also hoping for the Scud collection as a holiday gift. I own about half of the original run, but it’d be great to have it all in one place.

8. Bill Willingham’s decision to continue Fables: I am a huge proponent of the idea that every series needs a beginning, middle and end, and that open ended series are often a detriment to the characters in them. I think that, if you just keep your series going on and on without end, you will eventually see story and art quality decline. That being said, I was incredibly sad with the idea that Fables would be ending, and will thrilled when Willingham said it would keep going. So far, the series has remained a must-read, and I have faith that Willingham will shut it down when it’s time. There are few series which I enjoy reading more than Fables.

I read the first 7 or 8 volumes of Fables and really, really loved it. Of course, it was easier to follow when I owned a comic book store and could just pluck it off the shelf. This is one of those titles that my wife would love as well. I should probably invest in a set of trades for the home bookshelf.

9. Ed Brubaker/Steve Epting’s commitment to Captain America: I’ve been enjoying Brubaker’s Cap since he began writing it; it is, without a doubt, my favorite of the Marvel series. It’s very common, in this day and age, for writers (and artists) to come and go on titles pretty quickly. Brubaker and Epting have been detailing the events of Cap’s life (and death) since 2005 and it seems like they should soon be leaving, but so far, they’ve stayed with the book, and I thank them for it. I pity the poor writer and artist that replaces them, as they’ve truly built a legacy on that title that will be difficult to follow.

Still haven’t read these, but you’re tempting my eBay skills to land a complete set.

10. Most of the comics blogosphere: I’m going to focus on the good, and say how much I appreciate so many of the people out there on the internet who devote so much of their time to creating some of the most interesting comics sites around. I don’t get to hang out at a comic shop anymore; I actually worked at one for years, and then still hung there after I no longer was employed there, but I gradually became disaffected with many of the new employees and stopped going. For a period of time, I bought my comics online, until I finally found a new shop that I enjoyed. Sadly, that one closed, and I’m now driving about 30 minutes to get my comics. I don’t get to stop by as often, and I miss that sense of community. Luckily, the internet has provided a community like that for me. Dirk Deppey, Tom Spurgeon, Heidi McDonald, Chris Sims, Tucker Stone and many more who I will remember as soon as I post this have created websites that amuse, entertain and educate me. I feel like I’m hanging out at my old comics shop, listening to the people chatting about the business of comics, and I’m enthralled.

Those are some of the things for which I am thankful in 2008!

Awww, I was going to give you a virtual high-five for referencing the “new shop that I enjoyed” because I assumed you were talking about my store. But then you went on to mention a bunch of people you’ve never even met by their full names and I got nothing! You’re just sucking up to them for the site traffic! Boo!

Overall, an acceptable list (except for the kissassery at the end). I expect my list to be much more rambling and insulting. I’m planning to do this thing like a drunken frat boy on a 3-day bender at Mardi Gras. It’ll be all “I love you, man!” and then suddenly warp into “This sucks! I hate you all!” and then I’ll probably break down in tears, vomit on myself and slump down in the corner shoving spoonfuls of cold mashed potatoes in my mouth. Keep your fingers crossed for tomorrow! Hooray!